Monday, 23 June 2014

Dynamic 5G INFRASTRUCTURE from ZTE resembles DBOWMAN

ZTE unveiled details of a new 5G access network architecture based on dynamic mesh networking and IP backhaul. The move comes despite no formal industry definition of 5G being anywhere near confirmed.

“In 5G networks there could be many types of base station including UDN [user densification network], massive MIMO [multiple-input multiple-output], traditional macro, and D2D,” said ZTE in a statement. “These various base stations will coordinate with each other horizontally more often than they do in 4G networks, and so will require a dynamic and adaptive wireless mesh network.”

ZTE claims such an approach will make it possible for 5G networks to implement highly-effective SDMA (space-division multiple access) and expressed hope that this area would become the “next telecoms industry hotspot for 5G technology research”.

ZTE has already ploughed resources into SDA (software defined air-interface) technology – research began in 2009 – which it claims would help support a flexible 5G access network.

“ZTE’s 5G SDA solution allows self-adaptation of the air interfaces, so that in the same network, a network element can supporting a variety of services, and the SDA can allow multiple wireless access technologies for optimal adaptation, maximising air interfaces efficiency,” said ZTE’s Xiang Jiying. “At present, SDA technology is a key research area for 5G.”

For base station collaboration technology, ZTE said it had already developed its Cloud Radio solution, which lays a “solid foundation for partially-dynamic 5G mesh networks”.

ZTE’s announcement comes only days after Europe and South Korea announced a pact to jointly develop 5G technology. A definition of what 5G actually means is targeted for the end of 2015.

Project LOON on schedule for 2015 release

A year after Google’s plans for Project Loon became public, the company says plans to offer Internet access to rural areas via balloon are on track. In fact, leaders of the project recently said in an interview that they should be able to offer LTE data connections in “one or several countries” within the next year.

Google aims to create a fleet of 300 to 400 balloons that can circle the earth at an altitude that’s two times as high as commercial planes, and stay up for 100 days or more. In fact, the balloons have already travelled more than 1.5 million kilometres and circled the world in only 22 days, a world record. The Internet speeds from the balloon are 22 MB per second to ground antennae, and 5 MB per second to phones. The service is aimed at poor, rural areas, but it may also generate revenue by doubling as a roaming plan for users with a little more money.


Saturday, 21 June 2014

Project LOON adds excitement to South America over and above the World Cup football


A Project Loon test balloon allowed students in a rural classroom in Brazil for the first time ever to connect via wireless to the Internet right from inside their school. 

Google's Project Loon has reached several key milestones in testing being done in Brazil as the innovative Loon experiment moves forward to deliver affordable high-speed Internet access to users in remote locations using connections made through high-altitude balloons. One of the first successes is the connection of a school on the rural outskirts of the town of Campo Maior to the Internet for the first time using the wireless connections through a Loon balloon, according to a June 16 post on the Project Loon Google+ page. "The vast majority of this community doesn't have Internet or cell service—but the locals know of a few very specific spots around town where they might find a weak signal," the post states. "So if you see them sitting in trees, you'll know why. (In fact, they have a word for this—'vaga-lume,' which means 'fireflying' in English—because at night that's what the glow from their mobile phones looks like.) 



But with the Project Loon team in town and one of our balloons overhead, the students in [a] geography class were able to get to the Internet from their classroom for the first time as they learned about world cultures." 

The successful test flight also marked a few other significant firsts for Project Loon, the post states. "Launching near the equator taught us to overcome more dramatic temperature profiles, dripping humidity and scorpions. And we tested 4G LTE technology for the first time; this could enable us to provide an Internet signal directly to mobile phones, opening up more options for bringing Internet access to more places." Project Loon, which was unveiled in June 2013, is being touted as a high-tech way to create Internet connections for two-thirds of the people in the world who currently don't have Internet access due to high costs and the difficulty of stringing connections in rural and far-flung parts of the world. 

The Loon concepts were first tested at that time in an experimental pilot project in Christchurch and Canterbury in New Zealand, where 50 volunteer testers worked to connect with the balloons high above, according to Google. The New Zealand pilot tests showed that the concept could work and confirmed that balloon-powered Internet may be a viable approach. A Project Loon balloon was also in the news in May 2014, when it fell from the skies and struck a power line over Washington state as it was being tested, according to a story in The Yakima Herald. The incident occurred about two miles south of Harrah, Wash., knocking out power to a small number of nearby homes, the story reported. 

Google had notified the Federal Aviation Administration that the balloon was being brought down so that it could ensure that all aircraft stayed safely out of its path, the paper reported. "Since launching Project Loon in New Zealand last year, we've continued to do research flights to improve the technology," a Google spokesperson told eWEEK in an email response to an inquiry about the incident. "We coordinate with local air traffic control authorities and have a team dedicated to recovering the balloons when they land." The balloon that came down was apparently launched from Nevada as part of the ongoing Loon project tests. The balloons in the Loon project are purposely brought down by Google periodically for many reasons, including to inspect them and to collect data.

Tuesday, 17 June 2014

The only way for the EU to go is to invest heavily in 5G by partnering with others

http://www.mobileworldlive.com/europe-south-korea-landmark-agreement-5g?utm_campaign=MWL_20140616&utm_medium=email&utm_source=Eloqua&elq=daed4b3c9e874b37b2188f2268341250&elqCampaignId=1896

Tuesday, 10 June 2014

Overview of the public true broadband options



Broadband has become a critical infrastructure for communities in the 21st century. From a variety of sectors, including commerce, education, healthcare and government services, the demands for more advanced, reliable, and affordable broadband is challenging local governments to develop effective strategies for connecting their citizens, businesses, and institutions.

Communities lacking access altogether or still relying on first generation networks will find themselves on the wrong side of the digital divide and will find it challenging to attract and retain businesses, provide quality education, and deliver modern healthcare. Local government and community investment can serve as a path for bringing next generation broadband, while also developing network infrastructure and models to meet specific community needs and aspirations.

In the U.S., local governments and communities have taken the lead in building next generation broadband infrastructure. In more than 100 cities and towns across America, a public entity provides services to homes and businesses throughout the community.1 In many hundreds more, the locality provides cutting-edge communications services to such key community facilities as schools, libraries, hospitals, and senior centers. Indeed, public broadband networks in cities and rural towns are providing some of the fastest broadband connections to residents, businesses, and community anchor institutions.

This public effort has been made necessary by the failure of incumbent industries to build next generation infrastructure. As Blair Levin, architect of the Federal Communications Commission’s National Broadband Plan, noted in a speech in June 2012:

For the first time since the beginning of the commercial internet, the United States does not have a national wire line provider with plans to build a better network than the currently best available network.

Cable and telephone incumbents that often serve as the only broadband providers in most communities have not committed to making significant upgrades or investment in new infrastructure to ensure that each and every community has access to next generation broadband. And despite the attention Broadband has become a critical infrastructure for communities in the 21st century. From a variety of sectors, including commerce, education, healthcare and government services, the demands for more advanced, reliable, and affordable broadband is challenging local governments to develop effective strategies for connecting their citizens, businesses, and institutions. Communities lacking access altogether or still relying on first generation networks will find themselves on the wrong side of the digital divide and will find it challenging to attract and retain businesses, provide quality education, and deliver modern healthcare. Local government and community investment can serve as a path for bringing next generation broadband, while also developing network infrastructure and models to meet specific community needs and aspirations.

The challenge, however, for other localities seeking to build new broadband capabilities is to develop a plan for a sustainable and scalable project that meets the unique needs and aspiration of the community while accounting for the financial realities and other risks unique to each broadband project. That means there is no one-size-fits-all approach to developing a successful public broadband network. In some cases, a public network may not make sense at all. In others, the best strategy may be to start with a small network that connects only government and community anchor institutions. For others, an extensive, multi-service fiber network connecting residences and businesses may be the only means to ensure the community is not left behind in the digital economy.

The one thing communities cannot do is sit on the sidelines. Even the process of evaluating whether a public network is appropriate can be beneficial to community leaders as a means to better understand the communications needs of their residents, businesses, and institutions and whether existing services and networks are keeping pace.

The purpose of this report is to enable communities to begin the evaluation of their broadband options. The report begins with an overview of different network ownership and governance models, followed by an overview of broadband technologies to help potential stakeholders understand the advantages and disadvantages of each technology. It then provides a brief summary of several different business models for publicly owned networks. The final two chapters focus on the potential larger local benefits and the risks of a publicly funded broadband project.

[1] See “Community Network Map,” Institute for Local Self-Reliance,http://www.muninetworks.org/communitymap

[2] Blair Levin, “Upgrading America: Achieving a Strategic Bandwidth Advantage And a Psychology of Bandwidth Abundance To Drive High-Performance Knowledge Exchange,” (remarks given at Fujitsu Conference on Paving the Road to Unlimited Bandwidth:
Technologies and Applications for a Connected Age, San Jose, California, June 13, 2012) remarks available at http://www.gig-u.org/blog/upgrading-america-blair-levin-addresses-fujitsu-conference

The FreedomBox: Why You MUST Care!


Thursday, 5 June 2014

Digital Divide alternative solution to Project Loon's atmospheric balloons is also a Plan B from Google using many small LEO satellites

After experimenting successfully with Project Loon's high altitude balloons, Google is now also looking to use a fleet of low-earth-orbit satellites to bring Internet access to remote regions of the world.


The company plans to spend between US$1 billion and US$3 billion to initially bring 180 high-capacity satellites into orbit at lower altitudes than traditional satellites, the Wall Street Journal reported citing people familiar with the matter. The number of satellites used could double during the project.



The project is said to be led by Greg Wyler, the founder of satellite company O3b networks, who recently joined Google with O3b's former CTO, according to the Wall Street Journal. The project aims to overcome financial and technical problems that hindered earlier efforts, the newspaper said.



Google-backed O3b Networks launched its first satellites that aim to provide low-cost and high-speed connectivity to remote parts of the world in June 2013.



After experimenting with high altitude balloons, Google is now also looking to use a fleet of low-earth-orbit satellites to bring Internet access to remote regions of the world.



The company plans to spend between US$1 billion and US$3 billion to initially bring 180 high-capacity satellites into orbit at lower altitudes than traditional satellites, the Wall Street Journal reported Sunday citing people familiarAfter experimenting successfully with Project Loon's high altitude balloons, Google is now also looking to use a fleet of low-earth-orbit satellites to bring Internet access to remote regions of the world.



The company plans to spend between US$1 billion and US$3 billion to initially bring 180 high-capacity satellites into orbit at lower altitudes than traditional satellites, the Wall Street Journal reported citing people familiar with the matter. The number of satellites used could double during the project.